Finding Objects with Verbs Instead of Nouns

A key bottleneck in widespread deployment of robots in human-centric environments is the ability for non-expert users to communicate with robots. Natural language is one of the most popular communication modalities due to the familiarity and comfort it affords a majority of users. However, training a robot to understand open-ended natural language commands is challenging since humans will inevitably produce words that were never seen in the robot’s training data. These unknown words can come from paraphrasing such as using “saucer” instead of “plate,” or from novel object classes in the robot’s environments, for example a kitchen with a “rolling pin” when the robot has never seen a rolling pin before. We aim to develop a model that can handle open-ended commands with unknown words and object classes. As a first step in solving this challenging problem, we focus on the natural language object retrieval task — selecting the correct object based on an indirect natural language command with constraints on the functionality of the object.

More specifically, our work focuses on fulfilling commands requesting an object for a task specified by a verb such as “Hand me a box cutter to cut.” Being able to handle these types of commands is highly useful for a robot agent in human-centric environments, as people usually ask for an object with a specific usage in mind. The robot would be able to correctly fetch the desired object for the given task, such as cut, without needing to have seen the object, a box cutter for example, or the word representing the object, such as the noun “box cutter.” In addition, the robot has the freedom to substitute objects as long as the selected object satisfies the specified task. This is particularly useful in cases where the robot cannot locate the specific object the human asked for but found another object that can satisfy the given task, such as a knife instead of a box cutter to cut.

Our work demonstrates that an object’s appearance provides sufficient signals to predict whether the object is suitable for a specific task, without needing to explicitly classify the object class and visual attributes. Our model takes in RGB images of objects and a natural language command containing a verb, generates embeddings of the input language command and images, and selects the image most similar to the given command in embedding space. The selected image should represent the object that best satisfies the task specified by the verb in the command. We train our model on natural language command-RGB image pairs. The evaluation task for the model is to retrieve the correct object from a set of five images, given a natural language command. We use ILSVRC2012 images and language commands generated from verb-object pairs extracted from Wikipedia for training and evaluation of our model. Our model achieves an average retrieval accuracy of 62.3% on a held-out test set of unseen ILSVRC2012 object classes and 53.0% on unseen object classes and unknown nouns. Our model also achieves an average accuracy of 54.7% on unseen YCB object classes. We also demonstrate our model on a KUKA LBR iiwa robot arm, enabling the robot to retrieve objects based on natural language commands, and present a new dataset of 655 verb-object pairs denoting object usage over 50 verbs and 216 object classes.

You can read more in our paper and our code and data!

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